sugar

 

Research is limited on the correlation between sugar intake and arthritis.  However, this is becoming a trending topic and researchers are starting to complete more trials and collect more information related to this.  One study published in 2014 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition collected information from a group of women and their intake of soft drinks.  Data was collected over a 20-year period and the results showed a positive correlation between higher intake of sugar and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.  Those who consumed one or more sugar-sweetened beverages per day were 63% more likely to develop arthritis compared to those who consumed less than one serving per month.

 

            Some clinicians and researchers suggest that arthritis is not caused by the diet. For example, a study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that bacteria produced by internal body functions cause arthritis and related inflammatory diseases.  Therefore, even though the diet may not be the direct cause of rheumatoid arthritis, the excess amount of sugars being put into the body may create the perfect feeding ground for harmful bacteria that promote inflammation.

 

            There is much more research to be done on this topic; however, we do know from many other studies about the human body that excess sugar intake is never recommended.  Sugar should be consumed in moderation and is best when coming from natural sources such as fruit rather than processed foods like cake and cookies.

Resources 

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/100/3/959.full (The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition) 

 http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=533993 (JAMA Internal Medicine)