The Power of Christmas

The Power of Christmas

December is speeding by. The holidays are rapidly approaching. This is the time of year where we may often find ourselves embracing more merry making than muscle making. However, one of the best examples of physical fitness in the modern world is all around us this time of year, you just may not have realized it.
Santa Claus.
Yes. I said it.
Santa Claus.
You may be looking at your screen now and thinking, “Is this Horton guy crazy?” The answer, I am here to tell you today, is no. While depicted as white-bearded and festively plump individual that eats too many cookies and drinks too much milk, Santa Claus is actually the most physically fit individual in existence, and can serve as a huge source of inspiration in both our lives, and our workouts. To really understand this, we must analyze what it is that Santa Claus does.
Santa Claus’ feats:
1. Carries millions of tons of toys and coal in a bag.
2. Visits millions of homes in a single night.
3. Fits through chimneys.
Let’s break down these feats to understand the training that Santa Claus has surely put in to be able to do them.

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Research Links Physical Inactivity To Earlier Death

With the holidays approaching and daily schedules becoming more and more busy, many people may discontinue their usual exercise routines. But before you give up on this important healthy habit, consider the fact that physical activity is actually linked with a longer life. Did you know that research has shown that the more time a person spends being inactive, the higher their risk is for premature death? That’s right- inactivity is linked with an earlier death! Many chronic diseases that Americans experience including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and even some cancers, may be alleviated or prevented by regular physical activity. An inverse correlation exists between amount of aerobic activity and risk of premature death such that the more time a person spends in aerobic activity, the lower his or her risk is for premature death. Alternatively, the more time a person spends sitting or being inactive, the higher his or her risk is for chronic diseases, mental health problems, and premature death.

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Sets and Reps: Where to Begin

Strength training has tremendous benefits for people of all ages. However, most people that enter a gym for the first time do not know how many sets or repetitions to complete in order to achieve the maximal results. The benefits associated with strength training are: 1) increase in lean body mass; 2) increase in metabolic rate; 3) increase in bone density; 4) decrease risk of injury; and 5) building back lost muscle tissue that commonly occurs with aging.

The two most common results people look to achieve from working out are gaining size and strength.

Gaining Size

Training to gain size is associated with high reps consisting of shorter rest periods between each exercise. The number of reps should be kept around 8-15 with rest periods no longer than 30 seconds to two minutes. Complete three to five different exercises per muscle group, with three to six sets of each exercise. This type of training is referred to as hypertrophy training. Muscle hypertrophy is a term for the growth and increase of the size of muscle cells.  These muscle fibers are broken down throughout the course of your workout. Repair begins, which causes the muscle to grow back larger.

Gaining Strength

Increasing muscular strength involves training at a higher intensity. With the higher intensity, not as many exercises are n

eeded. Two to three different exercises per muscle group will suffice. The number of sets can be backed off to three to five per exercise. The number of reps should be kept to a min

 

imal, around 4-8 reps per set while increasing the amount of rest time to 2-5 minutes. Training at a higher intensity requires a different energy system than working for endurance with higher rep training. This system requires more time to recover in order to replenish the energy stores, typically around 3 minutes.

Now you may ask; what if I am looking to gain both size and strength? Cycle periods of low-rep training and high-rep training into your overall program, while progressively trying to increase your strength and perfect your exercise form every time you lift. Learn to incorporate both types of training into your program in order to maximize your gains. Begin with lower reps for your major lifts, such as squats and bench press. Follow up the low reps with higher re

p training on your minor lifts. Following this protocol will allow you to see an enormous gain in the amount of weight you are able to lift when starting a new workout program.

Unless you’re training for a specific sport or lift, don’t get in the rut of solely sticking with either type of training style. Strength training is about confusing your muscles so they do not become adapted to the same weight and exercise. You will not see results if you stick with the usual three sets of ten protocol. Find what works best for you so you do not fatigue out too quickly. Try new things that take you out of your comfort zone while still giving you a nice workout. The most important aspect in strength training is finding something you enjoy doing so you do not get discouraged and give up on yourself!

By Keaton Allen

DeFranco, Joe. (2015, July 03). Why All Muscle Was Not Created Equal. Retrieved from https://www.defrancostraining.com/why-all-muscle-was-not-created-equal/

Hitchcock, H. (2017, September 11). Mass Vs. Strength. Retrieved from https://www.livestrong.com/article/436092-mass-vs-strength/

Thomas, M. H., & Burns, S. P. (2016, April 01). Increasing Lean Mass and Strength: A Comparison of High Frequency Strength Training to Lower Frequency Strength Training. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4836564/

Wendler, J. (2018, May 21). 10 Strength-Building Strategies That Will Never Die. Retrieved from https://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/10-strength-building-strategies/

Grilled Chicken Tacos with Lettuce Slaw, Avocado and Cotija

Grilled Chicken Tacos with Lettuce Slaw, Avocado and Cotija

Skinnytaste.com

Servings: 4 • Serving Size: 2 tacos • Calories: 326 • Fat: 16 g

  • Protein: 30 g • Carbs: 22 g • Fiber: 5 g • Sugar: 2 g Sodium: 697 mg • Cholesterol: 83 mg

For the chicken:

  • 14 oz (4 thin sliced) boneless chicken breast cutlets
  • 1 1/4 tsp seasoned salt (I used Lawry’s Fire Roasted Chili & Garlic)
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp lime juice

For the taco:

  • 2 1/2 cups (4 oz) shredded romaine lettuce
  • 1/2 cup (1 medium) vine ripe tomato, chopped
  • 1/4 loose cup chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup thin sliced red onion1 tsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp lime juice
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • pinch fresh black pepper
  • 8 corn tortillas
  • 4 tbsp crumbled Cotija cheese
  • 1 sliced (5 oz) avocado
  • thinly sliced radishes, for garnish (optional)
  • 4 lime wedges, for serving

Directions:

Season chicken with seasoned salt, olive oil and lime juice and marinate for at least an hour.

Heat an outdoor grill or indoor grill pan on medium-high heat. Oil the grates and grill about 2 minutes. Turn and cook an additional 1 minute, or until cooked through. Set aside on a cutting board and slice into thin strips.

Parkinson’s Boxing, Version 2

Since January 2016, the Wellness Center has offered people in the High Country afflicted with Parkinson’s disease a helping hand in the fight against it. From January 2016 to June 2018, the Parkinson’s Boxing Program has been able to help over 25 people in the area improve their lives through boxing and socialization that was not available to them previously.

Beginning in June 2018, a revamped boxing program for Parkinson’s has been created to fulfill more aspects of fitness. Particularly if you’re at the Wellness Center in the early to late afternoons during the week, you may see a lot of coming and going between Classrooms 1 & 2 and the Spin Room. This new version of the program incorporates not only boxing but Yoga, Tai Chi, Weight Training, Zumba, and Cycling.

To create the most effective program, we’ve limited the boxing class sizes to 3 participants, but the additional class may have up to 6 participants at one time. This allows for a greater personalization per person, improves other areas of fitness such as posture and balance, and allows for improved socialization amongst the participants.

Entrance into the program requires a physician referral and a health screen from the Rehabilitation Center.
If you or someone that you’re close with may benefit from this program you may contact Martin Hubner MS, CSCS, Pn1 at the Wellness Center for more information (mhubner@apprhs.org or (828)266-1060). To schedule a health screen, contact the Rehabilitation Center at (828)268-9043.

 

Three Minds, Two Groups, One Vision

Our clinical programs make us more than a gym

The Wellness Center is well-known for all of the amenities offered to the community. This facility aims to please and we are continuously scheming new ideas in order to provide more for our members. Behind the scenes we offer a variety of clinical programs that may not be advertised, such as our Parkinson’s Boxing Program and our Action Potential Program. These programs are completely different, but they ultimately have the same goal: to provide nontraditional therapy in a fun and innovative way.

 

Newly redesigned Parkinson’s Boxing Program

Parkinsons_boxing_featureOur Parkinson’s program was founded by exercise specialist Martin Hubner, MS, CSCS, who is assisted by Dustin Oliver as well as Katherine Graham, PT, MA, from The Rehabilitation Center. Boxing does a variety of things for Parkinson’s disease, essentially slowing down the progression of symptoms. Our participants get to work on things such as coordination, balance, cardiovascular endurance, strength, and flexibility. Our boxing program is designed to give the participant an opportunity to have help in a way they may not get from a traditional physical therapy session. The newly designed structure allows the participants’ 60 minutes of boxing per week plus 60 more minutes of functional movement classes. We want to offer the participants as much as we possibly can to help with their progressions.

The newly designed format for our Parkinson’s program allows for tai-chi, yoga, Zumba, and cycling, which are all functional movement-based classes. The program design is deliberate yet fun and exciting. It is a great way to build camaraderie for those with common diagnoses and interests.

 

“Action Potential” Program for stroke survivors

The other non-traditional therapy program we offer here at the wellness center is “Action Potential.” Once again, this program was founded by our own Martin Hubner, MS, CSCS, who is assisted by Dustin Oliver and Katherine Graham, PT, MA. Much like our Parkinson’s program, this class aims to provide therapy through an enjoyable and nontraditional way.

Action Potential is designed specifically for individuals who are recovering from a cerebrovascular accident, otherwise known as a stroke. These participants have the option to come in three times a week for 60 minutes each session. Our participants have the opportunity to play games and enjoy time away from traditional therapy. The games promote functional movement that may not be attainable on a day-to-day basis. For instance, we implement games such as basketball, pickle ball, and much more.

In these games our main focus is on weight shifting, balance, and movement control. Adaptability is crucial because of the participants’ limitations and each situation needs to be malleable. Instructors change the dynamics of each sport to match the needs and accessibility of our participants. We want our participants to enjoy playing sports while focusing on proper movement mechanics mimicking that of a full recovery.

Our clinical programs aim to bring a community together that share a common interest. Within this community, we strive to promote a fun and enjoyable environment that focuses on functional improvement. The key behind our classes is the development of relationships. During training, we become a family by working towards a common goal: improving functionality.

If you or anyone you know has any further questions about the above classes please contact us online at http://apprhs.org/contact

By Dustin Oliver